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Condensed Matter Physics Seminar


Shadowing Growth of Nanostructures and Their Properties

Gwo-Ching Wang
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute , Troy, NY

Time
 
Thu. March 11, 2004     10:30 AM     Stirling 412B

Abstract
 
Nanostructrures made by glancing angle deposition by Robbie et al. [1] in the mid 90's has generated considerable interest. This technique uses the physical shadowing effect and can create facinating three-dimensional structures without lithography. At Rensselaer we are producing nanostructures on both flat surfaces and patterned substrates using glancing angle deposition [2]. In this talk I will discuss fundamental mechanisms in the formation of nanostructures by shadowing. I will also present atomic force microscopy measurements of mechanical properties (elastic response) of Si nanosprings, electromechanical properties (compression) of metallic coated nanosprings, and the scanning tunneling microscopy measurement of field emission properties of metallic nanorods. Our measured mechanical and electromechanical data will be compared with that of finite element modeling. Our results suggest that many new opportunities in nanoscale applications are possible.

Work supported by NSF.
[1] Robbie et al., Chiral sculptured thin films, Nature 384, 616 (1996).
[2] Y.-P. Zhao et al., Nano letters, 2, 351 (2002).

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