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Cave Lecture


The Future of Nuclear Weapons

Robert W. Nelson
Princeton University

Time
 
Fri. March 19, 2004     8:00 PM     Stirling D

Abstract
 
Although the United States and Russia continue to maintain thousands of nuclear weapons on high alert, neither country has developed or tested a new nuclear weapon in over a decade. However, policymakers within the Bush Administration have recently argued that the United States needs to develop new types of nuclear weapons to deter emerging security threats, particularly from third-world tyrants possessing weapons of mass destruction. This talk will discuss the utility of nuclear weapons for deterrence in the twenty-first century and the implications of future U.S. policy decisions for nuclear arms control and nonproliferation.

Robert Nelson is a Senior Fellow in Science and Technology at the Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the research staff at the Princeton University Program on Science and Global Security. He is a theoretical astrophysicist by training, and now works on technical issues related to nuclear arms control, treaty verification and nuclear nonproliferation. His research and writing emphasize translating sound science into sound government policy.

Refreshments will be available after the talk.

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